How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain

How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain

Knowing what causes the drains in your home to become blocked, and understanding how to keep them clear, can save you from having to call a plumber. Better yet, when you can maintain free-flowing drains, it is easier to keep your sinks and bathtub clean and clear. They will be less likely to get coated with deposits of whatever gunk that would otherwise become backed up and make a mess. Bathroom drains routinely become slow from sticky substances like toothpaste, shaving cream and hair which all collect in the drain pipe. Kitchen sink drains have similar problems because oil and grease tend to solidify and build up over time. Clean & Clear Tips From the Pros It is easy to treat and prevent these issues using items you already have at home. Below are some ways you can clear your drains and keep them running smoothly: 1. Do-It-Yourself Bathroom sinks and tubs usually become slow and blocked for different reasons than kitchen sinks, so you have to deal with them in different ways. For cleaning bathroom drains, ordinary table salt can be a very effective ingredient in your toolbox. Pour at least one tablespoon of salt into your bathroom drain followed by 1⁄4 cup of plain white vinegar, and let it sit for an hour. Then, run HOT water to clear out the all of the loosened substances from the drain. For best results do this a second time. 2. Maintain Your Sinks To keep your drain clear after you clean it out in this manner, from time to time pour a little bleach into the sink. Let it sit overnight or for at least an hour before you run water down the drain again. 3. Ditch the Grease Grease build-up in your kitchen sink drain can be remedied with liquid dish detergent and a large volume of boiling water. Put a big pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil. Squirt a generous amount of dish liquid (at least a tablespoon) directly into your drain and pour the boiling water into the drain, a little at a time. The rapidly boiling water will melt grease deposits while the detergent helps to dissolve grease and oil and allow the boiling water to flush it away. You may want to repeat this process two to three times if the grease build-up is substantial. 4. Hotter Than Usual Water It may seem obvious, but simply putting hot water down your kitchen and bathroom sink drains at least weekly can go a long way to keeping them clean and clear. For the kitchen sink, hot water will help to melt and flush away light grease deposits. Bathroom drains also benefit from very hot water, since you normally wouldn’t use such hot water for washing your hands or face. 5. Use Cold Water Wisely Conversely, when running your garbage disposal, run copious amounts of COLD water down the drain, not hot. Cold water will keep oils and grease in a solid state so they can be broken up by the disposal, whereas hot water will melt and soften grease and encourage it to coat the inside of your drain. Only use hot water after you have already run the disposal to help remove any grease deposits that may have formed when you were washing pots and pans. — Applewood’s licensed plumbers are experts at opening slow drains and at repairing damaged drain lines. If you have a problem that you can’t solve on your own, please call! We’re open 6AM-10PM 7 days a week, to serve you at your convenience with no overtime charges. Call 232-6611, or schedule service online.
how to clean bathroom sink drain 1

How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain

Hi. I’m a contractor, but not a plumber. I’ve also managed some fast food restaurants and movie theaters, both of which produce a lot of FOG type clogs. One of the things I learned early on was the “Hot Water Flush” method, with out anything added to it. However, especially depending on the temperature of the pipes (if you live in a mobile home for example, many times your drain pipe may run 1/2 the length of the house or more, and in winter they can even freeze). it is possible to move the grease (or FOG) further down the line where it makes a worse clog. And, in that location, the plumber has to work harder and will charge more. If the clog moves all the way out to the main sewer, things are fine. But if you constantly move FOG clinging to the pipes close to the sink with hot water, when it cools it turns to a solid again, and if your pipes are dirty in general, you can certainly see the possibility of a worse clog farther down where hot water won’t be as “hot” and could really become a problem.However, I have a slow kitchen drain currently, so I’m looking into options since it IS a mobile home and its below freezing outside. I know they’re not frozen – this drain has been slowing down for a while. I’ve tried the boiling hot water and was looking for something more. In my case, being a contractor and moderately experienced even with plumbing, I’ll take the traps out beneath the double sink and to the wall (they’re not installed right anyway) and replace them (allowing me to see if my problem is right there). If its not right there, I’ll try a snake and see what happens. I plan on moving the kitchen from the end of the trailer to the middle, and a 2nd bathroom on the other end to the other side of the middle in a future renovation – all that to say its no big deal for me to cut the pipe under the trailer and inspect inside to see what I’m really dealing with.With regards specifically to baking soda, vinegar and hot water vs hot water (plain) or mixed with detergent, the result, I truly believe, of clearing a slow drain is really due to the hot water. If you have a way to apply pressure to the drain (a plunger, OR amazingly, the core of a paper towel roll pushed onto the drain of the sink and blow hard), AND it’s still draining at least slowly – then fill with boiling water and let it drain slowly and repeat – if nothing, apply the plunger or paper towel method and you’ll most likely be able to blow the clog through.I am wondering about the effectiveness of a combination of methods… Baking Soda + Vinegar mixed with some detergent. That way you’re using the foaming of the chemical reaction to distribute the detergent to all sides of the pipe, close to the sink where normal dish washing water would begin to cool and where the clog most likely is. Then the flush with Boiling Hot water, which will get “hotness” further down the pipe because its hotter, washing away grease that has now been subjected to the detergent for a longer time. For that matter, there’s nothing wrong with boiling the vinegar, adding detergent and then pouring down a baking soda stuffed drain – being careful not to burn yourself (use a bath towel to block off the drain to allow the chemical reaction to expand through the drain in the proper direction, distributing the detergent further down.To your horror, I’m going to say, before calling the plumber, if nothing works, ONE CUP of bleach left over night will NOT kill the environment. Bleach is heavier than water, WILL make its way to the blockage and sit on it and dissolve almost anything. I’m not talking about a whole bottle or doing it every day – Just if nothing else seems to work.
how to clean bathroom sink drain 2

How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain

Thank you for this instructable. My comment isn't directed at this instructable. This comment is for people searching and might want not want to try this instructable until they try the wimpier way first. * If it's a bathroom sink or tub, the most likely culprit is hair. Try getting as much hair out by using a wire hanger, straightened out. Someone already mentioned that, I just wanted all the notes in one comment. Bring some white vinegar or apple cider (I have always that as I cook with it) to a simmer. I never measure but I'd suggest 1 to 1 1/2 cups of vinegar. Pour some baking soda (sorry, again I never measure) into the drain. Let’s estimate 1/2 cup. Use a wooden spoon or your hands, or whatever to get all the soda into the drain. Then pour the hot vinegar into the drain. It will foam and bubble up. Let that do it's thing for a while, let's estimate 15 minutes. While the timer is ticking, boil some water. Pour the boiling water down the drain. This may take a few applications before one will see results. It is suggested by some to do this on a regular basis as preventative maintenance. I suspect it depends on how hairy the people and how many people share these drains. Why not add it to your spring and fall cleaning schedule so at least it's being done twice a year. * Now, for kitchen sinks. The culprit is most likely grease. I've actually seen recipes that say to drain hamburger in the sink, (and then pour boiling water down the sink) for example. I suspect some people do not realize how much oil and grease they are dumping down the drain over a period of time. Buy some ubber cheap degreasing dish washing liquid. You can save the more expensive one for your dishes. Measure out 1 cup of the degreasing type dishwashing liquid and pour down the drain. Let it sit there as long as possible. Boils some water and pour that down the drain. From now on, pour any hot grease or oil into a can, I saved a tuna can for this purpose but one may need a larger can depending on their cooking habits. Once the grease has cooled, use paper towels, news paper (I get those ads once a week in the mail), or paper bags if you prefer to be a wee bit green and at least get a second use out of them, to wipe out the grease and toss. (Can you say “run on sentence.”?) Or if you eat a lot of tuna, just throw out the whole can.

How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain

How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain
How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain
How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain
How To Clean Bathroom Sink Drain

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